E Chord Shape

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  • #16906
    kali4
    Member

    Hello,

    I have a question about forming the E Chord shape. Everywhere this Chord is discussed it is suggested to Bar the 2nd fret with your pointer finger and bar the top three strings of the 4th fret with your ring finger.
    I personally find it much easier to just use my pointer finger on the 2nd fret of the A string (B note only) and bar the G, C and E strings of the 4th fret with my ring finger. I seem to get a much more consistent and clean chord with less muting of the other strings by not barring the entire set of strings with my pointer. I feel I am able to arch my ring finger better and clear the A string when I don’t bar the whole second fret for some reason.
    I know that some people may do things a little differently but as I am learning is there a benefit to learning to do it the conventional way? Will this make other chords in the future easier?

    #16933
    Rick
    Member

    Whatever fingering works best for you is fine. The trick is to get the chord to sound clear and be able to land the chord consistently. Sounds like you’ve accomplished that. It is an advantage to be able to play chord shapes with different fingerings as it can allow for easier transitions in many cases. That particular chord shape is movable up the fret board so it can be used extensively for other chords. It’s taken a lot of practice but I’m finally getting that shape to sound good on a consistent basis. I primarily use the “standard” fingering, but occasionally I use the fingering you mention if it makes for an easier change depending on what chord I’m switching from or to. Keep on practicing…

    #16936
    aldrinealdrine
    Moderator

    Rick is spot on with this one. You’ll eventually learn how to play each chord at least 2 different ways. The conventional way to play E does have its advantages. We use the pointer finger to barre the chord because we can look at the pointer finger as a movable nut. If we take our E chord and play it the conventional way, you can think of it as a D chord shape with our pointer acting as our new nut (0 fret) therefore, B, G#m, C#m, and A are easily accessible. That’s pretty important because in the key of E, those are the chords we will be playing the most.

    #16937
    aldrinealdrine
    Moderator

    I love this topic and I’ll discuss this even further on today’s live lesson

    #16952
    kali4
    Member

    Rick and Aldrine, thanks for your help! I especially appreciated the explanation in todays Live Lesson, very helpful!

    #16968
    kira
    Moderator

    For anyone curious, Aldrine talked more about holding the E chord on this week’s Live Lesson. You can check out the replay here: https://ukuleleunderground.com/courses/qa-sessions/8172017-live-lesson-replay/. The E chord discussion happens around 41:00 minutes into the lesson.

    #17319
    biggoomba
    Member

    That is how I play an E as well. I found it to be a lot easier to play an E with my pointer finger on the A and my ring finger for the other strings..

    I also play a D a little different as well, with my pointer finger on C, middle finger on G and ring finger on E. seems like in a lot of the songs I play, it’s easier for me to do it that way. I can be light on the C sometimes tho.

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